The Seasonal Grind: Summer Kayak Fishing | YakGear
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The Seasonal Grind: Summer Kayak Fishing

Summer kayak fishing is a time to leave the waders at the house, keep those insulated socks in the drawer and stock extra drinking water in the kayak. That’s right, it’s the best time of the year for kayak fishing. The temperature is not the only thing on fire right now — the bite is, also. If you’re lucky to get to fish on a day when the wind is low and the water is clear, your chances of getting into some nice fish are good. Let’s go over several items that are important while fishing during the hottest days of summer.

Hydration
Staying hydrated on the water is a must, whether the sun is out or not. When the fishing is nonstop, we often forget about being sure we’re drinking enough water. If you’re the type of angler who takes a portable ice chest along, your best bet is to freeze some bottled waters. They keep your ice chest cool and are ready to drink once they’ve melted. I take a gallon RTIC jug filled with ice and water, and this usually keeps me well hydrated for a day of fishing during the hottest of the summer months. A face shield dipped in water will keep your core body temperature just right and draping a spare towel over your head from time to time will work just as well. Once you feel dehydrated, it’s probably too late. So, try to drink even if you’re not thirsty.

Clothing
Harmful sunrays and extreme temperatures shouldn’t stop you from having a great time on the water. Covering up from the sun and staying cool in the heat is easy if you just have the right clothing on, and my clothing of choice while on the water is Tailin’ Toads. From socks to gloves and shirts to caps, Tailin’ Toads has you covered — literally. Those harmful sunrays can extremely damage your skin and cause cancer, so cover up.

Weapons of Choice
During early mornings I am usually throwing my favorite topwater lure, the Hunchback. Irresistible side-to-side motion and a wobble with a bit of shaky, this topwater lure is my go-to. When the topwater bite stops, I don’t hesitate to throw paddle tails. The redfish and speckled trout are active and looking for movement, and paddle tails give them just what they need to see in order to strike. Along with the heat comes that ugly, smelly, sticks-to-everything algae, and just about everything you throw into the mess will get tangled up in it. For some reason the redfish love this stuff. How I get away with fishing in it is using the GrassWalker from TroutSupport. With a completely weedless setup, the fish that thrive in these areas don’t stand a chance.

Organization
While on the water and in extreme temperatures, the last thing you want to do is deal with issues on the kayak. YakGear offers several ways to keep the clutter down and your mind on fishing. The YakGear Kayak Angler Crate Kits are some of my favorites. Featuring several different rigging options along with storage space, it keeps everything you need within arm’s reach. The YakGear CrateWell allows you to convert your crate into a livewell or an insulated cooler with ease, too. In my opinion, the YakGear crate and its accessories are the tools to go with

Just remember, as we continue through the season and you enjoy your summer kayak fishing, hydration is key. No stringer of fish is more important than taking a break and drinking some water. Cooler days are on the horizon, I assure you. I’m YakGear Brand Ambassador Ram Garcia and, as always, thanks for reading — and keep your rod tips high. I’ll catch you next time.

About the Author:
YakGear Brand Ambassador Ram Garcia grew up deep in the heart of South Texas, navigating and fishing waters along the coast. He spent most of his time on the water, learning the basics of fishing from his father. While he enjoyed traditional fishing, he craved more adventure — so he expanded his knowledge of the sport and conservation tactics and set his sights on kayak fishing. Ram enjoys fishing from banks to piers, rocks to potholes and every nook and cranny that could possibly hold a fish. He loves the feeling of casting into oblivion and anticipating the award of a great catch with every cast. He has fished inshore and offshore, focusing his attention on the sport and enjoying the journey as he worked to become the kayak angler he is today.

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